Corneal Endothelial Dystrophy/Degeneration

Endothelial Dystrophy – The cornea is normally the transparent “windshield” of the eye, serving to protect the internal structures of the eye while allowing light to enter for vision.  The endothelium is a single layer of cells that lines the inside of the cornea.  Though only a single cell layer thick, this layer is vital ...

Persistent Pupillary Membranes (PPM)

The pupillary membrane is a fetal structure that covers the pupil prior to birth.  It is supposed to resolve (go away) shortly after birth.  Sometimes part or all of it will persist.  This is known as Persistent Pupillary Membranes (PPM).  Most PPMs do not cause significant visual deficit, however some, particularly those that attach to ...

Distichiasis

Distichiasis is a condition where eyelashes emerge from a structure in the eyelid (meibornian gland) which does not normally produce hairs.  These “extra eyelashes” emerge so close to the eye that they can contact the ocular surfaces and can cause discomfort and corneal damage.  Distichiasis is considered an inherited problem as it is much more ...

Glaucoma

What is Glaucoma and How Does it Develop Glaucoma is a group of neurodegenerative diseases with the most consistent clinical finding being increased intraocular pressure (IOP).  Increased IOP is painful and causes damage to the retina and optic nerve, which can rapidly lead to irreversible blindness.  Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in animals ...

Neonatal Ataxia mutation in Jack Russell Terriers found

Dr Gary Johnson’s lab at the University of Missouri – College of Veterinary Medicine is pleased to announce that the mutation responsible for development of neonatal ataxia in Jack Russell Terriers has been identified, and a DNA test is now available. Neonatal Ataxia (NNA) is a progressive, neonatal onset, cerebellar ataxia described in Jack Russell ...

Development of a DNA Test

Some Jack Russell Terriers (JRTs) suffer from a progressive neonatal cerebellar ataxia that differs from a previously reported spinocerebellar ataxia in this breed. Serial neurologic examinations of affected pups revealed normal mentation, intention tremors and severe gait, stance and ocular ataxia beginning at 2 weeks of age. A dancing gait, hypometria in all limbs, decrease ...

Ataxia

Submitted by Debbie Johnson It has been almost 20 years since I first experienced Cerebellar Ataxia. I had spent several years acquiring a number of quality working bitches before I decided to purchase a stud dog that would compliment my acquired bitch’s pedigrees. Before long my first resulting litter whelped, I still remember the feeling ...

Ataxia in the Jack Russell Terrier

Cerebellar Ataxia a.k.a. neonatal cerebellar ataxia, primary granule cell degeneration Onset of signs – 2 weeks of age when pups begin to ambulate Neurologic abnormalities – An uncoordinated gait, spastic in all limbs, start out as a goose-stepping stride which progresses to a stilted stride in all limbs.  Dogs develop more difficulty in forward ambulation ...

Degenerative Myelopathy

Dr Joan Coates & Dr Gary Johnson & associates (University of Missouri) in collaboration with Drs Claire Wade & Kirsten Lindblad-Toh & associates (Broad Institute at MIT) identified a mutation that is the primary risk factor for Degenerative Myelopathy (DM) in many breeds of dogs. A DNA test for this disorder has been available since ...

Two Types of Ataxia

There are two types of ataxia in the Jack Russell Terrier, Cerebellar Ataxia and Spino-Cerebellar Ataxia, also referred to as SCA. These are two different genetic diseases, and at this time, we only have a genetic test for SCA. Cerebellar Ataxia This type of Ataxia is often referred to as Early Onset Ataxia and affects ...